Bulletin: Frameworks And Flow

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Yesterday, I spent time doing three inter-related things:

  1. I waited for @willsh
  2. I walked with @willsh
  3. I worked with @willsh

I’ve written before about how influential John has been on my own work, yet I’d never gotten the chance to actually work alongside him. This year, I’ve done so twice.

One of these times revolves around this:

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© Artefact Cards. Used by kind permission of John V. Willshire

This post is not about that. Although you can BUY a set of Artefact Traveller packs.

I got to London Victoria around 9am, stationed myself at the agreed meeting point and finished off reading Will Self’s most recent novel, Umbrella. It’s very good.

John arrived shortly after 9.30am and we had a walking meeting to his office space, via Green Park. Walking meetings are a good way to get all the general stuff out of the way, clearing space for thinking clearly. You can see a snap of us having that meeting if you’re not of a nervous disposition.

Following an hour’s call with another partner in the project, we had two hours to get a workshop together. Pulling together our notes from the call, and relying on John’s Flow Engines principle, we had a shape fairly quickly.

One of the themes of the project we’re undertaking together is adapting team working to ways that are different to how that team has worked previously. How do you create a framework that shifts people to the new in a simple, effective manner? John showed me this video by Tom Sachs and Van Neistat. It’s called Ten Bullets.

I’ve since watched this short three times.

These rules are not applicable to everywhere, but having a framework that’s simple, and therefore easy to understand, is. The rewards for adhering to that framework will also be clear.

Our next task on this project is to define that framework.

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